Toyota Announces Plans To Use Ford Smartphone Software

Toyota will utilize Livio’s SmartDeviceLink, an open-source software system that enables drivers to access smartphone apps using voice commands.

(Image credit: Toyota)
(Image credit: Toyota)

Toyota plans to deploy Ford's system to connect smartphones to car dashboards under an agreement announced by the automotive giants Monday.

The Japanese automaker — the world's largest — will utilize Livio’s SmartDeviceLink, an open-source software system that enables drivers to access smartphone apps using voice commands.

Ford acquired fellow Michigan-based company Livio in 2013 in an effort to create a standard platform for connected cars.

Toyota's move was seen as another attempt by the industry to counter in-car systems developed by tech giants Apple and Google.

"Ford is making the software available as open-source, because customers throughout the industry benefit if everybody speaks one language," said Don Butler, executive director of Ford Connected Vehicle and Services.

(Image credit: Toyota)(Image credit: Toyota)

Toyota plans to deploy Ford's system to connect smartphones to car dashboards under an agreement announced by the automotive giants Monday.

The Japanese automaker — the world's largest — will utilize Livio’s SmartDeviceLink, an open-source software system that enables drivers to access smartphone apps using voice commands.

Ford acquired fellow Michigan-based company Livio in 2013 in an effort to create a standard platform for connected cars.

Toyota's move was seen as another attempt by the industry to counter in-car systems developed by tech giants Apple and Google.

"Ford is making the software available as open-source, because customers throughout the industry benefit if everybody speaks one language," said Don Butler, executive director of Ford Connected Vehicle and Services.

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