Russian Factory To Declare Bankruptcy, Workers Still Unpaid

Two days after industrial workers at a plant in eastern Russia threatened to go on hunger strike over unpaid salaries, the company is due to declare bankruptcy.

In this photo taken Wednesday, Feb. 17, 2016, buildings of the AvtoVAZ car plant is seen above the residential buildings at the bottom of chimneys in the southern city of Togliatti on the Volga River, Russia. Once intended as a Soviet rival to the capitalist symbol of Detroit, Russia’s auto-making hub is sliding into economic depression. (AP Photo/Ivan Sekretarev)
In this photo taken Wednesday, Feb. 17, 2016, buildings of the AvtoVAZ car plant is seen above the residential buildings at the bottom of chimneys in the southern city of Togliatti on the Volga River, Russia. Once intended as a Soviet rival to the capitalist symbol of Detroit, Russia’s auto-making hub is sliding into economic depression. (AP Photo/Ivan Sekretarev)

MOSCOW (AP) — Two days after industrial workers at a plant in eastern Russia threatened to go on hunger strike over unpaid salaries, the company is due to declare bankruptcy.

The Primorsky regional administration announced Thursday that the government-owned electronics manufacturer Radiopribor will declare bankruptcy and become a subsidiary of the Dubnensky car factory.

Russian media on Tuesday reported that approximately 1,000 factory workers had said they would go on hunger strike if there was not a favorable outcome to talks with the Radiopribor administration over eight months of unpaid salaries.

Earlier reports indicated that Radiopribor has liabilities of over 223 million rubles ($3.24 million).

On March 1, the factory's director, Mikhail Kharchenko was placed under house arrest on accusations of not paying wages and tax evasion.

In this photo taken Wednesday, Feb. 17, 2016, buildings of the AvtoVAZ car plant is seen above the residential buildings at the bottom of chimneys in the southern city of Togliatti on the Volga River, Russia. Once intended as a Soviet rival to the capitalist symbol of Detroit, Russia’s auto-making hub is sliding into economic depression. (AP Photo/Ivan Sekretarev)In this photo taken Wednesday, Feb. 17, 2016, buildings of the AvtoVAZ car plant is seen above the residential buildings at the bottom of chimneys in the southern city of Togliatti on the Volga River, Russia. Once intended as a Soviet rival to the capitalist symbol of Detroit, Russia’s auto-making hub is sliding into economic depression. (AP Photo/Ivan Sekretarev)
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