Photos Of The Day: Boeing’s First-Ever 727 Makes Its Final Flight

First taking to the skies on Feb. 9, 1963, this tri-jet plane has since flown for 64,495 hours and made 48,060 landings.

(Andy Bronson/The Herald via AP)
(Andy Bronson/The Herald via AP)

The very first Boeing 727 prototype to roll out of production made its last flight Wednesday after 25 years of disuse.

(Andy Bronson/The Herald via AP)(Andy Bronson/The Herald via AP)

The three-engine plane made a 15-minute flight from Paine Field to Boeing Field in Washington before becoming a permanent display at the Museum of Flight.

(Andy Bronson/The Herald via AP)(Andy Bronson/The Herald via AP)

Unlike most prototypes of the time, the Boeing 727-00 N7001U — the first of 1832 727 Trijets built in Boeing’s Renton, Washington, plant — wasn’t kept as a test plane.

(AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)(AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

First taking to the skies on Feb. 9, 1963, this tri-jet plane has since carried about 3 million passengers, made 48,060 landings and flown for 64,495 hours, according to the Museum of Flight.

(AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)(AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

United Airlines received the plane on Oct. 6, 1964, for $4.4 million, but the plane generated more than $300 million for the airline.

Bob Bogash, a safety officer on the flight, sits in the cockpit of the historic Boeing 727 prototype. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)Bob Bogash, a safety officer on the flight, sits in the cockpit of the historic Boeing 727 prototype. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

The plane hadn’t been airborne since United Airlines donated it to the Museum of Flight in 1991 because United kept many major parts to use as spares.

(AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)(AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

After a significant renovation — with the parts of two additional donated 727s — the craft was deemed airworthy for this brief trip.

The flight, which went smoothly, took place under a special permit and included only essential crew.

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