Amada America Provides Equipment To Train Veterans In Advanced Manufacturing

Workshops for Warriors, a non-profit school providing veterans, wounded warriors and transitioning service members free training and nationally recognized industry credentials in the advanced manufacturing industry, announced that Amada America, Inc. has entrusted the school with their ENSIS 3015 AJ Fiber Laser and HG 8025 Press Brake.

Workshops for Warriors Welding Instructor Derek Beecher is a fellow Veteran with 30 years serving with the United States Navy. He specialized in welding nuclear and non-nuclear piping systems and structural components on board submarines and surface ships. (WFW photo)
Workshops for Warriors Welding Instructor Derek Beecher is a fellow Veteran with 30 years serving with the United States Navy. He specialized in welding nuclear and non-nuclear piping systems and structural components on board submarines and surface ships. (WFW photo)

San Diego, CA — Workshops for Warriors (WFW), a non-profit school providing veterans, wounded warriors and transitioning service members free training and nationally recognized industry credentials in the advanced manufacturing industry, announced recently that Amada America, Inc., a manufacturer of lasers and press brakes, entrusted the school with their ENSIS 3015 AJ Fiber Laser and HG 8025 Press Brake.

Beginning next semester, WFW will incorporate this innovative equipment into a new intensive course of instruction for advanced students. All students who participate in the class will earn nationally recognized credentials from Amada.

“A Fiber laser cutting system is a completely different animal than a CO2 laser and is a quantum leap forward in technology. Amada is the leader in laser and press brake machine tools and Workshops for Warriors is honored to have their continuous support over the years. This most recent entrustment allows our students to enhance their training on the latest manufacturing technology available today. These skills allow our graduates to work at leading companies across the globe and make an even bigger impact on America, and we couldn’t do it without Amada,” said Hernán Luis y Prado, founder and CEO of Workshops for Warriors. “From in-kind entrustments, to communications support, to FABTECH booth donations, to sitting on our Board of Directors, Amada has truly made an impact on WFW and continues to help us move forward in our mission. The entrustment of an ENSIS 3015 AJ Fiber Laser and HG 8025 Press Brake is proof of Amada’s unwavering support.”

Amada America, Inc. entrusts an ENSIS 3015 AJ Fiber Laser and HG 8025 Press Brake to Workshops for Warriors, a non-profit organization that trains, certifies, and helps place veterans, wounded warriors and transitioning service members into advanced manufacturing careers.Amada America, Inc. entrusts an ENSIS 3015 AJ Fiber Laser and HG 8025 Press Brake to Workshops for Warriors, a non-profit organization that trains, certifies, and helps place veterans, wounded warriors and transitioning service members into advanced manufacturing careers.

These newer machines will replace the FOM2 3015 NT CO2 Laser and FMB 3613G NT Press Brake that Amada entrusted to the school in 2013.

Amada America, Inc. is a longtime supporter of Workshops for Warriors and their mission to rebuild America’s advanced manufacturing workforce, one veteran at a time.

"Amada is extremely pleased to support Workshops for Warriors in their mission to train American veterans. There isn't a finer cause with which we could be allied,” commented Nick Ostrowski, general manager, Amada North America, Inc.

WFW trains, certifies and helps place veterans, wounded warriors and transitioning service members into advanced manufacturing careers by providing them with instruction, nationally recognized portable and stackable credentials, and hands-on experience. Training is provided at no cost to the Veterans, and Workshops for Warriors receives no Federal, State, or local funding. They rely on the generosity of corporate and private donations, and 83 percent of donations go straight to training programs. 

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