New National Park Marks Development of Nuclear Bomb

The park will tell the story of the three important historical sites and bring greater awareness of the development of nuclear energy and weapons to a worldwide audience.

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Interior Secretary Sally Jewell, seated, left, and Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz shakes hands after signing a memorandum of agreement to establish the Manhattan Project National Historic Park, Tuesday, Nov. 10, 2015, at the Interior Department in Washington. Standing, back row, from left are, National Park Service Director Jonathan Jarvis, Sen. Martin Heinrich, D-N.M., Sen. Tom Udall, D-N.M. and Sen. Maria Cantwell, D-Wash. (AP Photo/Sait Serkan Gurbuz)WASHINGTON (AP) — More than 70 years ago scientists working in secret created the atomic bomb that ended World War II and ushered the world into the nuclear age.

On Tuesday, Interior Secretary Sally Jewell and Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz formally established the Manhattan Project National Historical Park, as they sat in a federal building near the White House where plans for the bomb were developed.

The park preserves three sites where work on the bomb was completed: Oak Ridge, Tennessee; Hanford, Washington; and Los Alamos, New Mexico.

Jewell and Moniz say the park will not glorify war or nuclear weapons. It will tell the story of the three important historical sites and bring greater awareness of the development of nuclear energy and weapons to a worldwide audience.

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