Career education making a comeback in US high schools

ANTIOCH, Calif. (AP) — Decades after "shop class" became known as a lesser alternative for children deemed unfit for college, vocational education is making a comeback in American high schools. States such as California, Colorado, Louisiana, Massachusetts, New York, Ohio, and Tennessee are...

Mnet 73526 Rethinking Vocational Education Ap Tn
 
              In this photo taken on Tuesday, March 22, 2016, Antioch High School freshman Matilde Roblero, right, removes invasive plant species from the Antioch Dunes National Wildlife Refuge in Antioch, Calif. In the latest incarnation of vocational education programs that once prepared young people not bound for college for skilled trades, the federal government and states like California are betting big that connecting high school studies to the increasingly technical knowledge required in fields such as manufacturing, agriculture and information technology will get more students to graduate, go on to complete at least some college and find well-paying jobs. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)

ANTIOCH, Calif. (AP) — Decades after "shop class" became known as a lesser alternative for children deemed unfit for college, vocational education is making a comeback in American high schools.

States such as California, Colorado, Louisiana, Massachusetts, New York, Ohio, and Tennessee are looking to rebranded "career pathways" as a way to get more young people to pursue some post-secondary education and the stable, middle-income jobs employers say they can't fill.

The pathways in fields such as engineering, health care and digital media combine hands-on technical training with industry-specific academics — for example, using design or manufacturing principles as a way to teach advanced math.

Congress has endorsed the revival of such applied learning, at least in concept. An education reform bill adopted last year includes career and technical education, or CTE, in the definition of a well-rounded K-12 education.

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