Egg Industry Orders Up Kevin Bacon Ad Campaign; Will it Work?

The American Egg Board plans to launch an advertisement campaign later this week featuring "Footloose" actor Kevin Bacon. The Board will use puns involving his last name to help push eggs as a top staple in the American diet.

Mnet 142223 Kevin Bacon Lead

(AP Photo/American Egg Board)

If you're anything like me, than your daily breakfast consists of anything eggs; veggie omelet, scrambled eggs with fruit or even good ol' hard boiled eggs with toast.

What's more is this nutritious food is the one morning entree that is even better when served for dinner. But anyone who knows anything about cuisine, knows that the number one food to pair with eggs is bacon.

And now, the egg industry is ordering up a side of Kevin Bacon.

The American Egg Board plans to launch an advertisement campaign later this week featuring "Footloose" actor Kevin Bacon. The Board will use puns involving his last name to help push eggs as a top staple in the American diet. 

The group says this will be the first time in using a Hollywood celebrity as part of a major marketing push. But the campaign couldn't come at a better time for the industry, as U.S. consumers' protein craze has already helped to fuel sales after years of eggs being viewed as too cholesterol-laden.

Bob Krouse, CEO of Midwest Poultry Services, an egg producer in Mentone, Indiana, said he is glad the board is taking this fun marketing approach.

"I always felt like egg farmers were too conservative," Krouse added.

Just since last year, the egg industry is experiencing an uptick in consumption. In 2014, Americans consumed on average 259.8 eggs a year, according to a report from the USDA. That number is up from 249.3 in 2010.

While those numbers are slightly up, the industry said it has come a long way from the levels before the 1970s when consumers were eating on average nearly 300 a year. Americans have since cut back amid warnings about the high cholesterol found in egg yolks. 

In 1976, egg producers worried about the falling consumption levels and formed the American Egg Board to help promote eggs to show their nutritional value. 

But the consumption levels have slowly been increasing in recent years as American consumers are shifting their meal choices to include more protein, especially in the mornings in place of the carb-filled cereals of the past.

Will this campaign help the egg industry to gain a better hold on consumers by creating more sales, or is it just wasted money? Personally, I think it's a witty idea and if it helps to show the nutritional benefits of a food, all while being punny (haha) about it, than what's to really lose?

What are some other industries that could use celebrity fame as a push to create sales? Are there any other puns or unique twists within the food industry that could benefit?

 

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