Broken Rail Blamed For Fiery Train Derailment

Federal investigators have determined a broken rail probably caused a 2012 train derailment, explosion and spectacular fire that damaged a bus depot and led to evacuations in Ohio's capital city.

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Federal investigators have determined a broken rail probably caused a 2012 train derailment, explosion and spectacular fire that damaged a bus depot and led to evacuations in Ohio's capital city.

A report adopted this week by the National Transportation Safety Board concludes the broken rail was the probable cause of the Norfolk Southern train's derailment a little north of downtown Columbus on July 11, 2012. The Columbus Dispatch (http://bit.ly/1r5WR05 ) reports about 100 residents were evacuated and two people were injured.

One of the 17 cars that derailed punctured and spilled ethanol that fueled the huge fire. The report says two other cars holding ethanol went up in flames and exploded.

The report estimated damage totaling $1.2 million.

Norfolk Southern spokesman Dave Pidgeon declined to comment on the report.

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