West Coast Seaports Fully Reopen As Contract Talks Resume

West Coast seaports fully reopened Monday morning after two days during which no ships were unloaded amid a labor dispute between dockworkers and their employers. The two sides are negotiating a new contract, and bargaining table tensions have spilled over to the waterfront, where cargo is moving far slower than normal through ports...

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In this Wednesday, Jan. 14, 2015 photo, shipping containers are seen stacked up waiting for truck transport at the Port of Los Angeles. Negotiators working on a new contract for dockworkers at West Coast seaports, which handle about $1 trillion worth of cargo annually, have resolved a key dispute in their difficult talks, an association representing employers said Monday, Jan. 26, 2015. Functioning truck beds have been in short supply at those ports, an important factor that has contributed to the slow movement of cargo. Longshoremen have argued that employers miscalculated when they exited the chassis business, because outside companies got control over an asset that is essential to speeding containers out of dockside yards. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)West Coast seaports fully reopened Monday morning after two days during which no ships were unloaded amid a labor dispute between dockworkers and their employers.

The two sides are negotiating a new contract, and bargaining table tensions have spilled over to the waterfront, where cargo is moving far slower than normal through ports that handle about one-quarter of the nation's international trade.

Over the weekend, companies hired workers only to move from congested dockside yards cargo that already was unloaded. Employers said they needed to free space and wouldn't pay full crews they contend have been working slowly on purpose.

The dockworkers' union condemned the hiring cutbacks and said longshoremen stand ready to work.

Contract talks were scheduled to resume Monday afternoon in San Francisco.

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