Up to 1 in 5 trauma deaths could be prevented, study says

WASHINGTON (AP) — A stark new report finds that up to 1 in five deaths from gunshots, car crashes or other injuries may be preventable — and that where you live may determine whether you survive. Government advisers are urging creation of a national trauma system that puts the military's...

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              FILE - In this June 12, 2016 file photo, emergency personnel wait with stretchers at the emergency entrance to Orlando Regional Medical Center hospital for the arrival of patients from the scene of a fatal shooting at Pulse Orlando nightclub in Orlando, Fla. Up to 1 in 5 deaths from car crashes, gunshots or other injuries might be prevented with better, quicker trauma care that doesn't depend so much on where you live, according to government advisers _ advice that takes on new urgency amid the increasing threat of mass casualties like the massacre in Orlando.  (AP Photo/Phelan M. Ebenhack, File)

WASHINGTON (AP) — A stark new report finds that up to 1 in five deaths from gunshots, car crashes or other injuries may be preventable — and that where you live may determine whether you survive.

Government advisers are urging creation of a national trauma system that puts the military's battlefield expertise to work. Friday's call takes on new urgency amid an increasing threat of mass-casualty events like the Orlando shootings. That massacre happened blocks from a major trauma center — an accident of geography that undoubtedly saved lives.

The report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine found death rates vary twofold between the nation's best and worst trauma centers. But the greatest opportunity to save lives may be before the hospital, by improving nation's patchwork of first-responder systems.

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