Saunders Creates Manufacturing Jobs For Blind And Disabled Americans

Saunders Mfg. Co., Inc. is creating new opportunities to keep many Americans who are blind, visually impaired, or have significant disabilities working.

Jeddie Alexander has been blind since 1985, but he earns a paycheck every two weeks as a key member of the Dallas Lighthouse production team and supplier of US-WorksT products.  Saunders Mfg. Co., Inc. is creating new opportunities to keep Jeddie and many other Americans who are blind, visually impaired, or have significant disabilities working.

It's a little-known fact that 7 out of 10 working age Americans who are blind are not employed, which also holds true for more than 80% of people who have disabilities. Saunders has found in this an opportunity to provide manufacturing jobs all over the United States, and help these Americans who are blind or have disabilities support their families and live productive lives.

Saunders, a 65 year old Maine family business has launched a new brand of products under the US-WorksT label.  Partnering with non-profit community-based organizations who provide meaningful employment to people who are blind or have significant disabilities, Saunders expects its new US-WorksT product line will provide jobs throughout the U.S. for the manufacture and assembly of a wide range of products,including office, janitorial, and safety supplies.

John Rosmarin, president and CEO of Saunders, says, "While the purpose of this initiative is first and foremost to provide employment opportunities to those who are blind, visually impaired or have disabilities, it is with great pride that Saunders will deliver a line of top-quality products made in America. The dedication and satisfaction displayed by these individuals is apparent in the quality of their workmanship."

The US-Works brand uses recycled and environmentally friendly materials and practices whenever possible.  All products will be available online, in catalogs, and in stores nationwide. Now for the rest of the story, Jeddie Alexander lost his sight in an accident almost 30 years ago, but it has hardly slowed him down. Not only does he enjoy his job, but it enables him to support both his family and to pursue his passion of restoring old cars. He's currently working on a 1974 Chevy pickup in his spare time.

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