Last VCR Manufacturer Will Cease Production This Month

The era of the VCR is apparently about to come to an end.

In this Dec. 15, 1981, file photo, a sales clerk at an electronics store in the Akihabara District of Tokyo, displays a stack of video cassette recorders which are on sale for 20 to 30 percent off. Japanese electronics maker Funai Electric Co. says it's yanking the plug on the world's last video cassette recorder. A company spokesman, who requested anonymity citing company practice, confirmed Monday, July 25, 2016, that production will end sometime during the month, although he would not give a date. (AP Photo/Tsugufumi Matsumoto, File)
In this Dec. 15, 1981, file photo, a sales clerk at an electronics store in the Akihabara District of Tokyo, displays a stack of video cassette recorders which are on sale for 20 to 30 percent off. Japanese electronics maker Funai Electric Co. says it's yanking the plug on the world's last video cassette recorder. A company spokesman, who requested anonymity citing company practice, confirmed Monday, July 25, 2016, that production will end sometime during the month, although he would not give a date. (AP Photo/Tsugufumi Matsumoto, File)

The era of the VCR is apparently about to come to an end.

Long after the video cassette recorder was replaced by the DVD player and its high-definition cousins, the Associated Press reports that the last company to manufacture them will stop doing so sometime this month.

Funai Electric Co. became the final company to make the VCR after fellow Japanese company Panasonic left the market several years ago.

It produced 750,000 of the machines last year, and although that was down from 15 million in 2000, officials told the AP that customer demand remained relatively healthy.

Funai's suppliers, however, increasingly ceased their VCR operations and made continued production at its factory in China impossible.

Officials said that a Funai subsidiary will sell the last of its VCRs and offer maintenance services for the machines for as long as possible.

Funai, meanwhile, plans to introduce a new machine that would allow VCR owners to convert their VHS tapes to digital formats.

In this Dec. 15, 1981, file photo, a sales clerk at an electronics store in the Akihabara District of Tokyo, displays a stack of video cassette recorders which are on sale for 20 to 30 percent off. Japanese electronics maker Funai Electric Co. says it's yanking the plug on the world's last video cassette recorder. A company spokesman, who requested anonymity citing company practice, confirmed Monday, July 25, 2016, that production will end sometime during the month, although he would not give a date. (AP Photo/Tsugufumi Matsumoto, File)In this Dec. 15, 1981, file photo, a sales clerk at an electronics store in the Akihabara District of Tokyo, displays a stack of video cassette recorders which are on sale for 20 to 30 percent off. Japanese electronics maker Funai Electric Co. says it's yanking the plug on the world's last video cassette recorder. A company spokesman, who requested anonymity citing company practice, confirmed Monday, July 25, 2016, that production will end sometime during the month, although he would not give a date. (AP Photo/Tsugufumi Matsumoto, File)
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