Frozen Bread-Maker Fined $47K For Exposing Workers to Electric Shock Hazards

Service and maintenance machine workers at Good Old Days Foods Inc. are being exposed to amputation and electric shock hazards due to a lack of machine guarding and lockout/tagout procedures. These violations, 14 in total, are being cited by OSHA along with a $47,600 penalty.

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. — Service and maintenance machine workers at Good Old Days Foods Inc. are being exposed to amputation and electric shock hazards due to a lack of machine guarding and lockout/tagout procedures. These violations, 14 in total, are being cited by the U.S. Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration, along with a $47,600 penalty.

Two repeat violations, with a penalty of $14,000, were cited for worker exposure to housekeeping hazards, including ice accumulation on a freezer ceiling and floor holes on an expanded metal platform. Similar violations were cited in January 2012 at the same facility. A repeat violation exists when an employer previously has been cited for the same or a similar violation of a standard, regulation, rule or order at any facility in federal enforcement states within the last five years.

Nine serious violations, with a $33,600 penalty, were cited for worker exposure to possible amputation hazards for failure to guard rotating machinery parts and implement lockout/tagout procedures to protect workers who service or maintain machines. The company also exposed workers to electric shock hazards as they worked on machines with exposed wiring. A serious violation occurs when there is substantial probability that death or serious physical harm could result from a hazard about which the employer knew or should have known. Three other violations, with no penalty, were cited for obstructed exit routes, improper housekeeping and using extension cords where permanent wiring was required.

"Moving machine parts have the potential to cause severe workplace injuries, such as amputations, burns and crushing. Any machine part, function or process that may cause injury must be safeguarded to protect workers," said Carlos Reynolds, OSHA's area director in Little Rock. "Unguarded machines have the potential to seriously injure or kill a worker."

Good Old Days Foods, based in Little Rock and specializing in unbaked frozen bread and pastry products, has 15 business days from receipt of its citations to comply, request an informal conference with OSHA's area director, or contest the citations and penalties before the independent Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission.

To ask questions, obtain compliance assistance, file a complaint or report workplace hospitalizations, fatalities or situations posing imminent danger to workers, the public should call OSHA's toll-free hotline at 800-321-OSHA (6742) or the agency's Little Rock Area Office at 501-224-1841.

Under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, employers are responsible for providing safe and healthful workplaces for their employees. OSHA's role is to ensure these conditions for America's working men and women by setting and enforcing standards, and providing training, education and assistance. For more information, visit http://www.osha.gov.

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