Well, Samsung is replacing millions of new smartphones because the batteries can catch fire.

MORNING-NEWS-04 ...

NEWS-04

batteries can catch fire.>

ion batteries for years. This video shows the impact of a fire in a

simulated cargo hold. The agency and airlines are now warning flyers not to

use or charge the recalled Samsung Galaxy Note 7 onboard aircraft because

of a fire danger linked to its batteries.>

ANNE-MARIE GREEN: Well, Samsung is replacing millions of new smartphones because the batteries can catch fire. But that battery type is used in many products. Kris Van Cleave has more on the potential hazard.

(Begin VT)

KRIS VAN CLEAVE: The FAA has been concerned about the fire danger posed by lithium-ion batteries for years. This video shows the impact of a fire in a simulated cargo hold. The agency and airlines are now warning flyers not to use or charge the recalled Samsung Galaxy Note 7 onboard aircraft because of a fire danger linked to its batteries. Lithium-ion batteries power as many as ninety-five percent of rechargeable electronic devices, cell phones, tablets, laptops, children`s toys, even electric cars.

DAN STEINGART: The more energy you put into a small amount of space, the more likely something bad will happen if-- if it`s operated incorrectly.

KRIS VAN CLEAVE: Princeton University assistant professor Dan Steingart studies lithium-ion batteries. He says the danger comes if they`re overcharged or overheat.

DAN STEINGART: It`s like causing a little firecracker to go off within the battery. And then if you have one firecracker surrounded by many other firecrackers, and if the firecracker goes off, it will trigger the other ones to go off pop pop pop.

KRIS VAN CLEAVE: Most lithium-ion batteries are made in Asia, and the vast majority work without an issue, unless there is a manufacturing flaw, as was the case in the Samsung recall. Recalled hover boards often included cheaply-made batteries that weren`t designed for that kind of use which greatly increased the risk of overheating and fire. George Crabtree is with the Argonne National Laboratory.

GEORGE CRABTREE: The only warning sign is it will get too hot. If you happen to be holding it in your-- your phone in your hand or it`s in your pocket, you may notice that, and the right thing to do is to turn the phone off.

(End VT)

ANNE-MARIE GREEN: That was Kris Van Cleave reporting.

Well, one of Facebook`s newest features backfired for a Utah man over the weekend. Using recent photos, Facebook splices moments into cheery slideshows. Trouble was the man who took these was documenting what he called a near-fatal car crash. The video has gotten more than a million views on YouTube.

This is the CBS MORNING NEWS.

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