Clinton Makes Surprise Visit to Debbie Wasserman Schultz's Campaign Office; Donald Trump Facing Fallout on Second Amendment Comments; Trump

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Office; Donald Trump Facing Fallout on Second Amendment Comments; Trump

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(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

HILLARY CLINTON (D) PRESIDENTIUAL NOMINEE: I am committed to doing whatever I can to support her as she returns to the Congress, with your support by her side, because we have a lot of work to do and that is what I am really focused on.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

BARTIROMO: Clinton making a surprise visit to Debbie Wasserman Schultz's campaign office pledging to support the former DNC Chair in her congressional race.

Onto the other side of the race now, Donald Trump facing the fallout over comments he made about the Second Amendment yesterday. We've got the latest from the campaign trail on both sides of the aisle. (HEADLINES) (MARKET HEADLINES)

All those stories coming up this morning. Joining me this morning to talk about it, Maverick PAC National Co-Chair Morgan Ortagus; Recon Capital's CIO, Kevin Kelley; and, Conservative Commentator Kirsten Haglund. Good to see everybody.

MORGAN ORTAGUS, NATIONAL CO-CHAIR, MAVERICK PAC: Good to be here.

KEVIN KELLEY, CIO, RECON CAPITAL: Great to see you; good morning.

KIRSTEN HAGLUND, CONSERVATIVE COMMENTATOR: Happy hump day.

BARTIROMO: Big day yesterday. Donald Trump was on the show -

KELLEY: It was great.

BARTIROMO: -- talking about whether or not it's a pivot. Is that the way anybody sees it? Is he changing his campaign at all?

KELLEY: Yes, I think it's a total pivot, especially because you're seeing that he's even bringing up the Second Amendment. Before, you know, after he was called out for not knowing the Constitution, you're starting to see -

[Cross Talk and Laughter]

HAGLUND: I'm not sure you even want to mention the Second Amendment, but -

KELLEY: Right, but you can see he's trying to be more diplomatic, as well as trying to -

ORTAGUS: Are we talking about the same Donald Trump?

KELLEY: Right?

ORTAGUS: I don't see a pivot at all. I see Donald Trump continuing to be Donald Trump and to - I mean, he had a great speech on Monday, great economic speech, which is what I wish he would focus on, but, no, I mean, the Second Amendment statements, even though he clarified them on Hannity, does not represent the pivot, in my opinion.

BARTIROMO: We will talk about this because there's obviously a lot to debate about this; then there's the Clinton Foundation that we're going to do. Coming up this morning, former Georgia Congressman and Trump supporter Jack Kingston is with us. Former Reagan Economic Adviser Art Laffer is joining us; and CKE Restaurants and Ari's, as well as Carl, Jr.'s CEO and Trump Victory Committee Member, Andy Posner is with us. Former Democratic Vice Presidential Candidate and former U.S. Senator Joe Lieberman will also stop by; along with Azul and JetBlue Founder David Neeleman will join us, a lot to talk about in the airline business.

Meanwhile, new emails have been released from former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton's personal server by the conservative watchdog group Judicial Watch. The newly released 300 pages of emails show that the Clinton Foundation offered to State Department aides to open doors to donors.

FOX News' Peter Doocy with the very latest now in Des Moines, Iowa. Good morning to you, Peter.

PETER DOOCY, FOX NEWS CORRESPONDENT: Good morning to you, Maria. The big question is, did people who gave millions of dollars to the Clinton Foundation get the best treatment by the Clinton State Department even though the two, by law, are supposed to be separate because there are these new emails obtained by Judicial Watch, including some from the Clinton server that have never been released, that show Bill Clinton's former body man, Doug Band, pressuring then Secretary Clinton's aides, including Huma Abedin and Cheryl Mills, to put a Lebanese-Nigerian billionaire who has donated more than a million dollars to the Foundation in touch with the top diplomat in Lebanon.

That's not all. The Bill Clinton associate, Doug Band, later implored Secretary Clinton's aides at State to give a friend of his day job. Huma Abedin wrote back that the personnel had been sending that person options. The RNC now says about this that "the Clinton Foundation was calling in favors barely three months into Hillary Clinton's tenure at the State Department is deeply troubling and it is yet another reminder of the conflicts of interest and the unethical wheeling and dealing she'd bring to the White House."

But, the Clinton campaign contests that "neither of these emails involve the Secretary or relate to the Foundation's work. They are communications between her aides and the President's personal aide and, indeed, the recommendation was for one of the Secretary's former staffers who is not employed by the Foundation."

So, as all of that is going on in the campaign continues. Hillary is coming here to Des Moines this afternoon for a tour of a t-shirt store and then a rally at the high school. Trump was just in Des Moines on Friday and he trails Clinton in this state by less than a point in the Real Clear Politics polling average; Maria?

BARTIROMO: Really tight stuff there, Peter. All right; thanks so much. Peter Doocy. Want to bring in David Wohl, Political Analyst and Trump Supporter, along with Richard Fowler, a Radio Talk Show host. Good to see you both, Gentlemen. Thanks very --

RICHARD FOWLER, RADIO TALK SHOW HOST, via satellite: Thank you, Maria.

BARTIROMO: -- much for joining us. David, first let's talk about, sort of, the issues of the day, on the Clinton side, these correspondents and connections between the Foundation as well as the State Department; and then on the Donald Trump side, of course, those remarks yesterday about the Second Amendment. How do you see things?

DAVID WOHL, POLITICAL ANALYST AND TRUMP SUPPORTER, via satellite: Well now we know why she wanted that little ole server tucked away in her closet, where no one could see it. I mean, this highlights the ultimate pay-to- play scheme, Maria. You pay big bucks to the Clinton Foundation and you get big access to the State Department's influence, in getting jobs and international contracts, through countries such as Lebanon, and who knows what else because there's 33,000 other emails that were deleted by her lawyers that probably has a lot more going on with this, Maria.

Look, Rod Blagojevich just got his sentence modified, but he went to state prison for doing very similar things, influence peddling, trying to sell a Senate seat. The idea that Hillary Clinton won't be subject to criminal prosecution, the only thing that comes to mind is his name is Blagojevich, her name's Clinton. Other than that I see no difference. I think she's in big trouble if we get a serious independent prosecutor to look at this because this is influence peddling at its very worst.

BARTIROMO: Richard Fowler, how damaging is this?

FOWLER: I don't think it's damaging at all. Don't get me wrong; I think it's problematic but there is no clear connection in these emails to the Secretary, number one; and number two, we've litigated this email incident over and over again. I think the more and more republicans continue, and the Trump campaign continues to litigate this email "crisis", what you're going to have is they're going to be taking away from the issues. They should be focused on economics. They should be focused on, you know, Iran. They should be focused on getting American's back to work, but yet they continue to go back to this email argument thinking there's a big win here; that there's some sort of pot of gold in this rainbow and there is no gold and no rainbow.

BARTIROMO: It's not really about the emails as much as it's about the Foundation. Morgan, what do you think; do you think this is going to be damaging?

ORTAGUS: Not this particular batch of emails, to be honest. I think asking someone if you can get a job for them at the State Department, I mean, that's negligible. What the real smoking, you know, gun here is going to be, the speeches that were paid for by Bill Clinton, the incidents with Russia. Were there favors that were granted at the State Department? Did licenses get through? I think you really have to follow the money, and that is where the linchpin will be in this effort.

BARTIROMO: Kirsten, what do you think?

HAGLUND: I'm not sure if it's ever going to come out. I mean, I think that Republican's mistake has been to continue going after these things. Now I'm someone who's conservative and I think Hillary Clinton has shown very poor judgment but I don't think that this is the way to go because popular opinion is, that oh gosh, this is Republicans going after another email scandal and the American public can't differentiate between all these different leaked emails.

BARTIROMO: Right.

HAGLUND: They're not newshawks like all of us, and political junkies, like we are. So the American people, it looks like a circus.

KELLEY: That's true. Let us not forget also that Hillary Clinton's State Department passed a uranium deal after a donation was made to the Clinton Foundation. So the deal happened back in 2009, right; so --

BARTIROMO: You wonder if there's an investigation that will yield real facts. We'll see. it might happen after the election.

ORTAGUS: There is a separate investigation still going on with the FBI, --

HAGLUND: Right.

ORTAGUS: -- and I think that's what hasn't -- it's not been talked about in Director Comey press conferences, there still is a separate one.

BARTIROMO: Right, he doesn't want to talk about it.

WOHL: Maria, if you can buy off Hillary Clinton, which is what this amounted to, I mean, for her to say that she has nothing to do with the Clinton Foundation is absolutely laughable. People made big donations to her Foundation, the Bill and Hillary Clinton Foundation -

HAGLUND: Right.

WOHL: -- and in exchange they got huge political favors, I mean, that is corruption.

BARTIROMO: Yes, that's the point.

WOHL: Plain and simple.

BARTIROMO: That's why we're - then there's the Donald Trump story, Richard; the comments on the Second Amendment. Voters are now scrutinizing that. Let's listen to what he said, I want to get your reaction to it.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

DONALD TRUMP (R) PRESIDENTIAL NOMINEE: If she gets to pick her judges, nothing you can do folks. Although the Second Amendment people, maybe there is. I don't know.

Nobody in that room thought anything other than what you just said. This is a political movement. This is a strong, powerful movement, the Second Amendment. You know, Hillary wants to take your guns away. She wants to leave you unprotected in your home. This is a tremendous political movement. There can be no other interpretation.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

BARTIROMO: Now, Clinton Campaign Manager, Robbie Mook, responded with a statement, and he says, "This is simple, what Trump is saying is dangerous. A person seeking to be the President of the United States should not suggest violence in any way."

Is the media overreacting to this comment or is that really the way it's seen? I mean, he could have basically been suggesting that the Second Amendment people should come out and vote.

FOWLER: I think what Donald was suggesting was the former and not the latter, Maria. It's very obvious that the Second Amendment can solve that, i.e. meaning that, you know, the fact that we have the right to bear arms can solve the problem with Hillary Clinton's judges. This is problematic for Donald Trump but this is not a surprise.

Let me be very, very, very clear. This is par the course for Donald Trump. Just a couple months ago he said that you should punch the protester in the face. He kicked out a crying baby from a rally. He, you know - he's made fun of a disabled journalist. Once again Donald Trump keeps moving the goal post on what is disgusting, what is misogynist and what is downright insane for a presidential candidate.

BARTIROMO: If that's what he meant, that's outrageous. I can't imagine that's what he meant, but what do you think, David?

WOHL: No, I mean, for gosh sakes, (1) ironically, the Second Amendment people, NRA people, are among the most law abiding people in the nation. So the idea that he would urge them to violence is silly. I mean, they're certainly not like the, I don't know, the hundreds of people, thousands of people that just got their sentences commuted by Barack Obama for certain gun crimes. I mean, would be concerned about those people. The Second Amendment people, NRA people, no.

I listened to it and it was pure politics. People and the Second Amendment, NRA -

FOWLER: So you're telling me -

WOHL: Wait a minute -

BARTIROMO: What does the panel think?

WOHL: -- vote in big numbers; they organize in big numbers. That's clearly what this was about; no question about it.

FOWLER: Absolutely not.

KELLEY: Listen, the liberal media is making it seem, and assuming that he said, for the Second Amendment people to come out and strike violence. There is no mention of violence. For people to assume, then they need an introspect on themselves because it's "Get Out the Vote".

BARTIROMO: That's true. That's true.

HAGLUND: And, you know, people can perceive things different ways and, of course, maybe the media, you know, over did it in their coverage, but the bottom line is whether he meant it as a movement or he meant it as actual violence, it just shows the carelessness with which he speaks. As commander-in-chief you have to be aware of that but his public loves it; his people love that. He's going to keep doing it.

ORTAGUS: I keep going back to the Brexit vote in June because I saw the opposition totally overplay every time that they talked about the E.U. - the U.K. leaving the E.U. I say that to the people who are going against Donald Trump, if you overplay every single little thing he says, it's going -

HAGLUND: It desensitizes it.

BARTIROMO: Richard, during the - yes, go ahead.

FOWLER: I don't think we are overplaying this at all. I think -

BARTIROMO: No?

FOWLER: Listen, you could literally take the quote of what he said and called what it is. You can't put lipstick on a pig and say it's not a pig. But, once again, I think what's more bothersome to me, Maria, is this constant defense of this ridiculous rhetoric from Donald Trump. Even his own supporters have got to say okay, Donald. Clearly you've gone too far. Clearly you said too much. But over and over again -

WOHL: Because he hasn't -

FOWLER: -- and they find a justification for this. So let's not forget, in the primary, this type of rhetoric worked but in the general election, when you're talking to all 50 states, it is not working. That is why a recent poll in Georgia had Hillary Clinton up four-point in Georgia.

BARTIROMO: Yes.

[Cross Talk]

BARTIROMO: Well it's incredible how tight the race is in other states, but certainly she has the upper hand in a number of them.

WOHL: Maria?

BARTIROMO: Yes, David; go ahead, final word here.

WOHL: I mean, the reality is now we have the issue of the mainstream media completely relinquishing -

FOWLER: Don't blame this on the media; blame this on Donald Trump.

WOHL: -- its credibility and its integrity. Hold on, Richard. Whoa! Whoa! It's relinquished its journalistic integrity and credibility in order to wage -

FOWLER: All right, here we go.

WOHL: -- full out war -

BARTIROMO: All right, we've got to go.

[Cross Talk]

BARTIROMO: David Wohl, Richard Fowler, we're out of time. Guys, listen; nobody can understand what you're saying when you talk on top of each other. Have a great day, guys. Thank you.

Still to come, it looks to be a turbulent travel day for Delta passengers again, a third straight day. We'll tell you about it next; stay with us.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

BARTIROMO: Welcome back. More delays for travelers this morning as Delta tries to work out problems from Monday's computer outage. Cheryl Casone with the headlines now; good morning, Cheryl.

CHERYL CASONE, FBN CORRESPONDENT: Yes, good morning, Maria. (HEADLINES) In an effort to calm investors about ESPN's growth, there's a lot of fear about that right now, Disney announced it's going to spend a billion dollars to take a 33-percent stake in BAM-TECH, which is a streaming media unit that was created by Major League Baseball.

Now in a conference call, Maria, CEO Bob Iger announced that part of the streaming deal includes the launch of this new digital service. It will come from ESPN later this year. It will have games that the regular networks don't actually air on the linear channels. By the way, Maria, this is big; ESPN has lost 3.7 million cable subscribers, just in the past year. So Bob Iger, many believe, had to do something.

BARTIROMO: That's true, because that's really the competition is. Thanks, Cheryl. Kevin Kelly with us this morning, and, Kevin, we were all focused on streaming, the revenue there, as well as ESPN. What did you think of the streaming deal?

KELLY: This is a really big deal because they are already down about 88 million subscribers, when it comes to ESPN. That's their big cash cow. We saw theme parks and the studio really carried them, but this is a huge deal. They're trying to find a way to answer this because Disney actually commands a higher multiple than their peers and they're still not able to figure out how to use solve the streaming issue.

People are still cord cutting - in the industry they call it OTT, over-the- top, and that's still gaining traction, not only here in the United States but globally. So addressing this issue aside is really hard for the companies right now.

BARTIROMO: This is an industry issue, obviously?

KELLY: Yes, it's a huge industry -

BARTIROMO: It's got smaller properties coming out and doing streaming and taking market share.

KELLY: Yes, and you're seeing it's getting more and more competitive. HULU just announced that they're getting rid of their free model and they're putting that over to Yahoo! So now they're even trying to generate more revenue on that side to make up for the customers that they're losing; so it could get more expensive and more competition.

BARTIROMO: All right. The stock is under pressure this morning. We've got the Dow component. That's going to set the tone for the broader markets. We're going to take a break, and then oil prices under pressure this morning. OPEC members considering a production freeze. We had to the floor of the CME next, for more on the impact on crude prices and global markets.

Then, campaign trail controversy. Hillary Clinton under fire after the Orlando nightclub killer's father sits right behind her at a rally, a prominent seat for the killer's father. Keep it right here on "Morning with Maria." I don't get this at all.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

BARTIROMO: Welcome back. We're watching the oil market this morning, pulling back ahead of supply data later this morning. Phil Flynn at the CME Group this morning, checking out the markets. Phil, good morning to you.

PHIL FLYNN, FBN CORRESPONDENT: Hey, good morning, Maria. Yes, we did get a little bit of a bounce on the possibility of OPEC with an emergency meeting a month ago, but that is going away this morning. One of the reasons is the report we saw out of Saudi Arabia. Apparently, Saudi Arabia's oil production hit an all-time high last month of 10.67 million barrels a day.

Now that is going to make it more difficult for OPEC and non-OPEC countries to come to an agreement because if you freeze production at record highs, it doesn't do a lot of good for the countries that can't produce near that much oil. At the same time if you look at why Saudi Arabia is raising production, it isn't to increase export market; it is to meet increasing domestic demand. They've had a very hot summer in Saudi Arabia. They use a lot of oil to keep cool there. Their oil inventories, domestically, have been falling. So really they've had to raise production to meet demand.

If you look at the export market, Saudi Arabia has a lot of incentive to try to get a production freeze in place because they are losing market share to China from Russia. If they can get Russia on board to a production freeze, that is going to be in Saudi Arabia's best interest.

The other thing we want to thing we want to look at today is oil inventories. We did see a surprise last night in the American Petroleum Institute report of over two million barrels, but we saw a big drop in gasoline supplies; almost four million barrels. So that is what we are going to be looking for on the EIA today; back to you.

BARTIROMO: Phil, thank you; Phil Flynn in Chicago this morning. Kevin Kelly, the implications for global markets, even though oil is down this morning, you're still talking $42 a barrel. It's been pretty stable at high levels; relatively?

KELLEY: Yes, relatively speaking. I mean, we were up 13-percent in the month of July alone on West Texas Intermediate.

BARTIROMO: Okay.

KELLY: So it's come down pretty precipitously since it went up to $50, and one of the reasons why it went up to $50 is because there were supply disruptions in Nigeria and Canada; so that actually really threw the price off. We saw that it wasn't real, so that's why it's come back down to $42. We saw from (Inaudible) Petroleum, Hess, they said they need $60 a barrel for them to get adequate margins and for them to increase their activity. We're not getting anywhere near there. OPEC has lost every efficacy of their mandates. Member nations aren't even listening.

I mean, $38 is really the price target that people are seeing the price go to, if you look at the charts -

BARTIROMO: Right.

KELLY: -- and you see the fundamentals. It is coming down to that, so it is really hard to see, right now, how oil, just given the global growth environment we're even in right now.

BARTIROMO: Yes; and, of course, growth gets another look when we get a window into retail sales, at the end of the week. That's going to be the report to look at. That is, the July retail sales number, coming out Friday morning. We've already seen a number of retailers come in below expectations this week.

We're going to talk about the Clinton campaign finally speaking out about the father of the Orlando shooter getting the front-row seat to her rally. Check this out; Sadiq Mateen sitting up front at a Hillary Clinton rally. How did he get that seat? More on this controversy straight ahead.

Plus, Chipotle customers about to get much happier. The restaurant chain now offering drinks, special. Special and alcohol, to attract fans. More on Chipotle's Happy Hour moves straight ahead; back in a minute.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

BARTIROMO: Welcome back. Good Wednesday morning, everybody. I am Maria Bartiromo. It is Wednesday, August 10th. Here are top stories 6:30 a.m. on the east coast.

Pay to play, e-mails revealing how the Clinton Foundation ordered Hillary Clinton closest aide to open State Department doors to donors. This coming as the campaign tries to downplay the appearance of the Orlando gunman's father at a very prominent seat in one of her rallies.

There he is, Sadiq Mateen (ph), sat just a few rows behind the nominee as she paid tribute to the victims of the Pulse Nightclub attack.

On the other side of the race, Donald Trump facing fallout over comments he made yesterday about second amendment, but he also took on Clinton's stance on the economy ahead of her policy speech expected tomorrow.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

TRUMP: I gave a massive tax decrease yesterday and regulations, we are going to get rid of so many of them, but Clinton is going to double your taxes. She's going to double up your taxes. She is trying to say well I don't like Trump's plan, but she's double up your taxes. You're going to have massive tax increases if Clinton gets in. Enjoy it, folks.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

BARTIROMO: We've got very latest from the campaign trail coming up.

Gunfire erupting in Ferguson, Missouri at a protest march on the anniversary of Michael Brown's death. The latest there coming up.

American Airlines working to improve the flying experience, find out what the company is offering next.

Plus what goes better with Mexican food than a margarita, how about a free one? Chipotle's latest efforts to bring people to its restaurants, alcohol.

Turning to markets this morning, futures are indicating a fractional gain for the broader averages. Take a look. Stocks are sitting near record highs. The Nasdaq this morning is going to open at another all-time high, which it closed out yesterday. As you can see 4,794 on the Nasdaq.

In Europe, stocks are taking a pause from five-day winning streak. In Asia overnight, little change.

Disappointment for Boston Red Sox fans, meanwhile, the team cancelling a giveaway of David Ortiz's bobble head dolls just hours before the game. We will tell you why.

Democrats accusing Donald Trump of encouraging violence against Hillary Clinton. The Republican presidential nominee responded last night on "Hannity." Fox News' John Roberts with very latest from Abington, Virginia. John, good morning to you.

JOHN ROBERTS, FOX NEWS: Maria, good morning to you. Donald Trump wakes up this morning finding himself in a familiar place right in the eye of a political firestorm, after comments that he made yesterday.

At a big rally at University of South Carolina in Wilmington warning that Hillary Clinton would likely appoint Supreme Court justices who would uphold new laws that would restrict the sale possession of guns. Donald Trump said this, listen.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

TRUMP: Hillary wants to abolish -- essentially abolish the second amendment, by the way, if she gets to pick -- if she gets to pick her judges, nothing you can do folks. Although the second amendment people may be there is, I don't know, but -- but I will tell you what. That will be a horrible day.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

ROBERTS: Now a lot of people interpreted that as Donald Trump encouraging Second Amendment supporters to take matters into their own hands should Hillary Clinton become president.

And the Clinton campaign as you might -- imagine they would immediately starting a fundraising drive off of that. Donald Trump insists though he was merely talking about the political power of Second Amendment supporters at the ballot box.

Tweeting out yesterday quote, "Media desperate to distract from Clinton's anti-2A stance. I said pro, 2A, Second Amendment citizens must organize and get out, vote and save our constitution.

Speaking to Sean Hannity last night Donald Trump insisted that any notion that he meant anything other than the political power of Second Amendment words is absolute nonsense. Here he is.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

TRUMP: Nobody in that room thought anything of it than what you just said. This is a political movement, this is a strong powerful movement, the Second Amendment. You know, Hillary wants to take your guns away, and there can be no other interpretation even reporters have told me, I mean, give me a break.

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