For years IKEA has been under increase pressure to do more about the Malm brand products but had always stopped short of a recall.

THIS-MORNING-06 ...

MORNING-06

Malm brand products but had always stopped short of a recall.>

and chests at the risk of tipping over, following the death of three

children in the past two years.>

(Man speaking foreign language)

CHARLIE ROSE: I want him for my cheerleader. There he is again. The Icelandic announcer went crazy last night after Iceland knocked England out of the Euro 2016 soccer tournament. The two-to-one loss was so humiliating, England`s coach quit right after the game.

GAYLE KING: Wow.

CHARLIE ROSE: In case you missed it, the announcer was saying you can leave Europe. You can go wherever you want.

GAYLE KING: We definitely missed it. I couldn`t understand anything he says. But you got to love somebody that has passion for their job.

NORAH O`DONNELL: Yeah.

CHARLIE ROSE: Passion.

NORAH O`DONNELL: I love--

CHARLIE ROSE: It`s a new definition of passion.

GAYLE KING: Yes.

NORAH O`DONNELL: --I loved that Mark Phillips on EVENING NEWS last night ended his tag by noticing that Iceland beat England and that he said the ignominy is complete.

CHARLIE ROSE: Exactly.

GAYLE KING: Yes.

NORAH O`DONNELL: Yeah.

GAYLE KING: Yes.

NORAH O`DONNELL: First Brexit, then the soccer to full circle.

CHARLIE ROSE: Yeah.

GAYLE KING: Yeah. That was a nice way to close it. You were talking about that.

CHARLIE ROSE: Our wordsmith.

NORAH O`DONNELL: Yeah.

GAYLE KING: Welcome back to CBS THIS MORNING. Coming up in this half hour, IKEA issues a massive recall after some of its furniture crushes three toddlers. Did the world`s largest furniture retailer act fast enough? How the recall could lead to industry-wide changes.

NORAH O`DONNELL: Plus, Brazil`s latest Summer Olympic debacle. Ahead, see why thousands of doping tests may suddenly have to be sent overseas and what Ben Tracy found inside the country`s multimillion-dollar anti-doping lab.

CHARLIE ROSE: It is time to show you some of this morning`s headlines.

The Dallas Morning News reports on the impact of the Supreme Court`s latest abortion ruling. The court`s five-to-three decision yesterday overturned parts of a restricted Texas law. The majority said it placed in, quote, "undue burden on [the] constitutional right to abortion." The ruling could have a ripple effect across the country. A dozen other states have similar laws.

NORAH O`DONNELL: The Washington Post says a training program run by the United States for anti-ISIS fighters graduated fewer than one hundred people. The revamped program is focused on training spotters to help American and Allied with the airstrikes. The original program was shut down last year after efforts to create a Syrian army resulted in only about two hundred trained fighters.

GAYLE KING: Britain`s Guardian reports that the black box from EgyptAir plane that crashed in the Mediterranean has been fixed. Egypt made that announcement about Flight 804`s data recorder yesterday. Work is set to begin on the cockpit voice recorder. The jet came down last month killing all sixty-six people on board. French prosecutors Monday opened a manslaughter investigation. They have found no evidence of terrorism so far.

CHARLIE ROSE: The New York Times reports on an unprecedented ceremony today featuring the reigning Pope, honoring a retired one. The ceremony was held inside the Vatican to celebrate emeritus Pope Benedict`s sixty-fifth anniversary of his becoming a priest. Pope Francis greeted Benedict with a kiss on both cheeks. Francis praised Benedict`s entire life spent in priestly service.

NORAH O`DONNELL: Mm.

CHARLIE ROSE: I`m for one would love to know the conversation between these two--

GAYLE KING: Yes.

NORAH O`DONNELL: Yeah.

GAYLE KING: Me, too.

CHARLIE ROSE: --you know.

NORAH O`DONNELL: Right.

GAYLE KING: Me, too.

NORAH O`DONNELL: Right.

GAYLE KING: They have a lot in common.

NORAH O`DONNELL: It is unprecedented.

GAYLE KING: Yep.

NORAH O`DONNELL: And the Denver Post reports that the Red Cross is taking down posters. Critics called racist safety posters displayed at two municipal pool shows how children should behave. But the activities labeled not cool depicted some minority children behaving badly and failing to follow the rules. But all of the children labeled cool and following the rules were white. The Red Cross has apologized.

GAYLE KING: Sure would like to know how many people sat in the room and approved that poster.

NORAH O`DONNELL: Exactly.

GAYLE KING: Because when you look at it it`s just so blatantly insulted on so many levels.

IKEA is pushing a massive recall this morning over dressers that could be deadly. The retail giant is calling back about twenty-seven million of its dressers and chests. The products are capable of tipping over and crushing little kids. Vinita Nair is here with the action that some critics say comes much too late. Vinita, good morning.

VINITA NAIR (CBS News Correspondent): Good morning. For years IKEA has been under increase pressure to do more about the Malm brand products but had always stopped short of a recall. Following the death of a twenty-two- month-old child earlier this year, the company is changing direction, admitting it hasn`t done enough and is now trying to make things right.

(Begin VT)

VINITA NAIR: IKEA is pulling the plug on at least twenty-seven million dressers and chests at the risk of tipping over, following the death of three children in the past two years. In a statement, the Swedish retail giant said, "We are announcing this recall...given the recent tragic death of a third child. It is clear that there are still unsecured products in customers` homes, and we believe that taking any further action is the right thing to do."

Last year, instead of a recall, IKEA launched this ad campaign warning customers of the dangers of falling furniture. They also distributed three hundred thousand anchoring kits designed to secure the dressers to a wall.

RACHEL WEINTRAUB (CFA Legislative Director and Senior Counsel): An education campaign was not the answer to this product safety hazard.

VINITA NAIR: But some consumer safety experts called that decision a half measure and say the products should have been called back long ago.

RACHEL WEINTRAUB: I don`t think this was quick enough. This product needed to come off the market. I wish it had been sooner, I wish that no children had been killed and no children had been injured.

VINITA NAIR: On average, one child dies every two weeks from falling TVs or furniture. At least six deaths have been connected to IKEA`s Malm dresser.

ELLIOT KAYE: Many times it`s just not the parents` fault.

VINITA NAIR: Last year after twenty-three-month-old Curren Collas was killed by an IKEA dresser, we spoke to Elliot Kaye, chairman of the Consumer Product Safety Commission. He`s calling for the furniture industry to do more to protect children.

ELLIOT KAYE: When the furniture is inherently more unstable then it needs to be, industry can do far better in making much more stable products and I`m challenging them to do that.

(End VT)

VINITA NAIR: IKEA is expected to release more details on how customers with these dressers can get their refunds. The company is also reportedly offering to send crews into people`s homes to tether the furniture to a wall. The biggest issue is, you know, so many young kids--

GAYLE KING: yeah.

VINITA NAIR: --they`re crawling up on the dresser.

GAYLE KING: Yep.

VINITA NAIR: Once you have all that weight in it from clothes and toys and whatnot that`s when it becomes really unstable.

GAYLE KING: Easy to tip over. Yeah.

NORAH O`DONNELL: Yeah. And it`s-- it not just IKEA. I have a dresser in my kids` room that we had to secure to the back too that when you pull out the drawers, it falls over--

GAYLE KING: Mm-Hm.

NORAH O`DONNELL: --which is so scary.

VINITA NAIR: I don`t think parents think about it either.

GAYLE KING: Yeah.

VINITA NAIR: So it`s an important reminder--

NORAH O`DONNELL: Yeah.

VINITA NAIR: --also.

NORAH O`DONNELL: It shouldn`t do that. It should be weighted better on the back of the dresser. Yeah. Anyway, Vinita, thank you so much.

The Justice Department this morning is expected to announce a landmark settlement with Volkswagen over its emissions scandal. The Germany car giant has reportedly agreed to pay 14.7 billion dollars. It would be the largest settlement by an auto maker in U.S. history. Volkswagen admitted last year that it installed illegal software in eleven million vehicles to cheat on emissions tests. Volkswagen, reportedly, will repair or buy back polluting vehicles and give owners up to ten-thousand-dollar compensation-- 2.7 billion dollars would go toward cutting pollution. Another two billion would fund research on zero emissions technology. The settlement would require a judge`s approval.

CHARLIE ROSE: A police officer outside Philadelphia is out of the hospital this morning less than a week after he was shot seven times. Officer Christopher Dorman got a huge welcome yesterday as he went home. The twenty-five-year-old was shot Friday during a drug investigation. He needed at least two operations. Dorman`s mother says the trauma did not seem to faze him at all.

RUSKOWSKI: As you know, he was shot in the groin, and he just wanted to make sure he had all those parts. So that`s one example of his-- his sense of humor.

CHRISTOPHER DORMAN: I would like to say thank you to everybody for being there for me and my family, and my fellow brothers in blue through this. And everybody`s supported me, it`s a lot. I appreciate it.

CHARLIE ROSE: A suspect is in custody, accused of attempted murder and aggravated assault.

GAYLE KING: We`re glad he`s okay.

NORAH O`DONNELL: Yeah.

GAYLE KING: But did you hear his mother say that he just wanted to make sure he had all of his parts, and he is okay--

NORAH O`DONNELL: He is okay.

GAYLE KING: --after being shot in the groin.

NORAH O`DONNELL: Yes.

GAYLE KING: It`s scary stuff.

NORAH O`DONNELL: And, hopefully, he`ll get those Kenny Chesney--

GAYLE KING: That`s right.

NORAH O`DONNELL: --tickets. Yeah.

GAYLE KING: Kenny said they`re going to hang out and have a beer.

NORAH O`DONNELL: Mm-Hm.

GAYLE KING: Rescuers this morning hope to have another chance to free a trapped blue whale. The seventy-foot long mammal was spotted yesterday off the Southern California coast. It is all tangled up in hundreds of feet of fishing line. Experts with a knife on a thirty-foot pole were unable to cut that line. They will try again today if they can find the whale. So the search continues.

NORAH O`DONNELL: The Rio Olympics are just over five weeks away and now Brazil`s ability to catch doping athletes is in jeopardy.

BEN TRACY: I am Ben Tracy in Rio de Janeiro. One of the biggest concerns at the Olympics this summer is cheating. We`ll take you inside Rio`s new sixty-million-dollar anti-doping lab ahead on CBS THIS MORNING.

NORAH O`DONNELL: And if you are heading out the door you can watch us live through the CBS All-Access app on your digital device. How does it, work, Gayle?

GAYLE KING: Well, it works well.

NORAH O`DONNELL: Right. Yeah. We`ll look at why shark attacks are rising with the founder of OCEARCH. We`ll be right back

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