Dyson, the company famous for its vacuums, is jumping into the battle to fight bad hair.

THIS-MORNING-08

MORNING-08

battle to fight bad hair.>

continues to expand its range of products.>

NORAH O`DONNELL: Dyson, the company famous for its vacuums, is jumping into the battle to fight bad hair. It unveiled the new hair care device this morning in Tokyo. The firm continues to expand its range of products. And only on CBS THIS MORNING Anthony Mason is here with a first look at the Dyson Supersonic. Your hair looks nice, Anthony.

ANTHONY MASON (CBS News Senior National Correspondent): Thanks so much. Thanks so much. Good morning. James Dyson has been making use of the air around us for more than three decades. And today, the company that bears his name launched the Supersonic hair dryer. An invention, he says, that`s designed to revolutionize your routine.

(Begin VT)

JAMES DYSON: I want them to last.

ANTHONY MASON: It`s been thirty years since James Dyson first invented the bag-less vacuum and built an empire out of air. There are bladeless fans, hand dryers, heaters, humidifiers, and purifiers. Now, Dyson hopes his latest invention will blow you away.

JAMES DYSON: The first thing you notice is very light and very slim and very nicely balanced. The second thing you`ll notice when you switch it on. I`ve just switched it on, is that it`s very quiet, so I can carry on talking to you while I`m doing my hair.

ANTHONY MASON: He spoke with us from Tokyo, where Dyson launched his new hair dryer amid great fanfare earlier this morning.

Why are you in Tokyo?

JAMES DYSON: Well, the Japanese love new technology and this was the country that I first launched my vacuum cleaner.

ANTHONY MASON: So it`s a sentimental favorite for you in a way?

JAMES DYSON: Very sentimental, yes.

ANTHONY MASON: The dryer, which Dyson says is lighter, faster, and more efficient, took over four years and more than two hundred million dollars to develop.

You put a lot of money and technology into this?

JAMES DYSON: Yes. It`s been-- it`s been very interesting. I mean, first of all, we developed a new motor. And really the motor is the real key to this. You see that`s a conventional motor, which is big and heavy, and it`s-- it gives flow but not pressure. We`ve developed a motor that size, tiny motor, which is, of course, much smaller, much lighter, and very much faster, and gives very high pressure.

ANTHONY MASON: Like many Dyson products, all that technology comes at a higher cost to consumers. The Dyson Supersonic is expected to retail for about four hundred dollars.

You think people are going to pay that price for a revolutionary hair dryer?

JAMES DYSON: Well, people really care about their hair, and they care about their beauty. They don`t want to damage their hair. And they want nice smooth glossy hair. So yes, I think they will pay for it, at least I hope they do.

ANTHONY MASON: For all its innovation Dyson is not without its skeptics. A recent study published in the Journal of Applied Microbiology claimed Dyson`s jet hand dryers, common in public restrooms, spread about thirteen hundred times more germs than paper towels.

What`s your response to this study?

JAMES DYSON: Well, it was a ridiculous study. Exactly like the paper bag manufacturers tried to do when we introduced a vacuum cleaner that didn`t require paper bags. We had the same kind of issues, but they quite quickly went away as we gained market share.

ANTHONY MASON: Dyson is confident his hand dryers will remain a fixture in bathrooms worldwide and looks forward to the Dyson hair dryer becoming another addition to your routine.

Was it more challenging than you thought it would be?

JAMES DYSON: It always is. But we enjoy a challenge, so I don`t-- we don`t mind that and, you know, going through those hundreds, if not thousands of miles of hair testing it is-- it`s just all fun. It`s absorbing. It was great fun.

(End VT)

ANTHONY MASON: They actually had a hundred engineers working on this project. The Dyson Supersonic hairdryer expected to make it to America in September. It is, in fact, considerably quieter than--

CHARLIE ROSE: Than the one you`re used to.

ANTHONY MASON: --then-- than the one that usually wakes up my wife in the morning when I put it on, you know.

CHARLIE ROSE: It dries your face as well.

ANTHONY MASON: Well, people pay-- pay four hundred dollars for it. I don`t know but they say Dyson--

GAYLE KING: Yes, They will.

ANTHONY MASON: You think so?

GAYLE KING: They will. Yeah because as he said, we care about our hair and our beauty.

NORAH O`DONNELL: Shiny.

GAYLE KING: And our beauty.

CHARLIE ROSE: And-- and--

ANTHONY MASON: First customer right here.

CHARLIE ROSE: Exactly. Right here.

GAYLE KING: Yeah.

CHARLIE ROSE: And because they have a brand identity that`s very good.

GAYLE KING: It`s true. Yes.

NORAH O`DONNELL: Yeah.

GAYLE KING: That`s absolutely true.

NORAH O`DONNELL: I want to try it.

GAYLE KING: They`ve got a good reputation.

NORAH O`DONNELL: I want to try it.

GAYLE KING: Thank you, Anthony.

NORAH O`DONNELL: Yes.

GAYLE KING: Thank you very much. And your wife thanks you, too.

ANTHONY MASON: Yeah, I`m not kidding.

GAYLE KING: A mysterious fireball lights up the sky across Southern California. Ahead, find out what U.S. strategic command says about that flash seen across hundreds of miles.

But, first, it is seven forty-seven. It`s time to check your local weather.

(LOCAL WEATHER BREAK)

(ANNOUNCEMENTS)

CHARLIE ROSE: Dash cam video shows an incredible streak of light Tuesday night over Southern California. Witnesses across hundreds of miles reported seeing the giant green fireball. U.S. Strategic Command says it was likely not man-made. The bright object does not appear to be among the satellites it tracks.

NORAH O`DONNELL: That`s pretty cool.

CHARLIE ROSE: Oh, boy.

NORAH O`DONNELL: All right. The presidential campaign rolls up on a glamorous red carpet. Ahead, well go inside TIME`s celebration of the world`s most influential people and see how Donald Trump competed for the spotlight. You`re watching CBS THIS MORNING.

(ANNOUNCEMENTS)

END

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