Reading the fine print before we click agree to online contracts is a disagreeable task for most of us, and that most definitely includes our

NEWS-SUNDAY-MORNI-07

SUNDAY-MORNI-07

a disagreeable task for most of us, and that most definitely includes our

Faith Salie.>

have to sign in order to post on Facebook or download iTunes or even watch

a movie? You know, the fine print that says you can`t sue the company, even

for negligence--the contracts that say, in negative-three-point font, that

you`ll now be billed by the Cheese of the Month Club for the rest of your

life? If you answered never, then you`re like me, and just about everyone

on earth.>

ANTHONY MASON: Reading the fine print before we click agree to online contracts is a disagreeable task for most of us, and that most definitely includes our Faith Salie.

(Begin VT)

FAITH SALIE: When`s the last time you thoroughly read one of those contracts you have to sign in order to post on Facebook or download iTunes or even watch a movie? You know, the fine print that says you can`t sue the company, even for negligence--the contracts that say, in negative-three- point font, that you`ll now be billed by the Cheese of the Month Club for the rest of your life? If you answered never, then you`re like me, and just about everyone on earth. Fewer than one in a thousand people read these things. Of course, we click agree. We have lives to lead. Well, here are some things you`re agreeing to. In case you`re thinking of suing Apple, you`ve already agreed that, to avoid muscle, joint, or eye strain you should always take frequent breaks. Apple`s warning us about iTunes, but they could just as well be describing how it feels to read their mind- numbing contract. Many e-contracts average seventy-four thousand words. Instagram`s contract is only five thousand, but if you agreed to it, there`s no telling where your selfies could end up. A few years ago, an online game company`s contract actually called for its customers to surrender their immortal souls. And guess what, seventy-five hundred people clicked goodbye to their souls. This kind of legalese is not easy on the eyes or brain. If only I had a lawyer to help.

Are you a lawyer?

LANCE KOONCE: Yes. My name is Lance Koonce and I am a lawyer.

FAITH SALIE: Do you read these things?

LANCE KOONCE: The short answer is almost always no. I don`t. I read contracts like that if it`s for a big transaction or for something-- for something expensive. And so it`s not surprising, Justice Roberts in the Supreme Court a few years ago said he didn`t read them, either.

FAITH SALIE: Is there any risk to just clicking agree so I can go on with my life?

LANCE KOONCE: There`s always some risk. Generally speaking, I think consumers don`t have great risk when they click agree because most transactions are small transactions. And anything that was really outrageous or egregious that someone tried to sneak in, the courts probably would not up-- uphold.

FAITH SALIE: Well, that`s good news. Look, I wear my seatbelts. I don`t smoke. I`ve earned the right to live life on the edge and sign these contracts without reading them. But if you are more prudent than I am, I have some good news for you. Contrary to what your mom told you, doctors now say that reading super-fine print is actually good for your eyes.

(End VT)

(Begin VT)

ANTHONY MULE: (INDISTINCT) operate is good?

MAN: Yeah, that`s fine.

ANTHONY MULE: Awesome. You tested it?

MAN: Yeah.

ANTHONY MULE: How`s the-- the detergent coming out, good?

SUSAN SPENCER: Anthony Mule goes to work knowing he will face some sticky situations.

ANTHONY MULE: This is a passion for me.

SUSAN SPENCER: So you`re on a mission?

ANTHONY MULE: We`re on a mission to clean up the country, one piece of gum at a time.

SUSAN SPENCER: He is a seriously professional gum removal.

Little boys dream of being astronauts or policeman or fireman. Did you dream of this?

ANTHONY MULE: Actually, no. I-- I absolutely did not dream of gum, but somehow I stepped in it, so--

SUSAN SPENCER: No chance of running out of work. Americans chew their way through three billion dollars worth of gum every year. And when they`re done--

ANTHONY MULE: People just spit it out wherever and whenever it loses its flavor. I`ve seen gum stuck on walls. It`s on the floor of the bar or under the stool, mostly on city sidewalks. All those little black spots that you see on the floor.

SUSAN SPENCER: You are going to make me very aware of this. I am now going to be obsessed to seeing gum everywhere.

ANTHONY MULE: Yes.

SUSAN SPENCER: And when you see it, who are you going to call? GumBusters, of course. Mule is the CEO.

ANTHONY MULE: This is the brand-new battery-operated gum-removal machine. It`s the world`s first.

SUSAN SPENCER: I want one of these for Christmas.

He showed us what gum busting is all about. The special magic produced with a high-powered combination of steam, detergent, and a wicked brass brush.

ANTHONY MULE: That gum is busted.

SUSAN SPENCER: That`s great.

ANTHONY MULE: Gone.

SUSAN SPENCER: Where-- where does it go?

ANTHONY MULE: Actually, it vaporized.

SUSAN SPENCER: Mule says he can vaporize up to twelve hundred pieces of gum an hour.

Isn`t sort of like trying to empty the Atlantic with a teaspoon, you know?

ANTHONY MULE: I--

SUSAN SPENCER: Yeah.

ANTHONY MULE: --I agree.

SUSAN SPENCER: You don`t get demoralized.

ANTHONY MULE: I don`t. I love it.

SUSAN SPENCER: And remarkably, he says he also loves gum.

ANTHONY MULE: I`m actually chewing gum now.

SUSAN SPENCER: I know. I`m going to do it when you`re done. That`s--

ANTHONY MULE: Dispose of it responsibly.

SUSAN SPENCER: In other words, wrap it up.

ANTHONY MULE: Save the wrapper, put it in your pocket or your pocketbook and save it till you`re done.

SUSAN SPENCER: You have a lot of faith in people.

And a lot of pride in satisfying work he clearly enjoys.

Do you consider this an odd job?

ANTHONY MULE: It is. It`s quite unique. It`s odd, and a dirty job, so yes.

SUSAN SPENCER: But somebody has to do it.

ANTHONY MULE: That`s right. Let it be us.

SUSAN SPENCER: Chew on that for a while.

(End VT)

ANTHONY MASON: Next, exploring the opal underground.

DEBBIE CLAY: I found about twenty thousand dollars worth. Just across the top of here and it actually--

SETH DOANE: Of opal?

(ANNOUNCEMENTS)

END

(Copy: Content and programming Copyright MMXVI CBS Broadcasting Inc. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Copyright 2016 CQ-Roll Call, Inc. All materials herein are protected by United States copyright law and may not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, displayed, published or broadcast without the prior written permission of CQ-Roll Call. You may not alter or remove any trademark, copyright or other notice from copies of the content.)

More