Samuel K. Sia Columbia Engineering developed an innovative strategy for an integrated microfluidic-based diagnostic device—in effect, a lab on a chip

Columbia engineering innovative hand-held lab-on-a-chip could streamline blood testing worldwide. Successfully tested in Rwanda, mChip diagnoses infectious diseases like HIV and syphilis at patients' bedsides; new device could streamline blood testing worldwide New York, NY — Samuel K....

Samuel K. Sia Columbia Engineering developed an innovative strategy for an integrated microfluidic-based diagnostic device—in effect, a lab on a chip

Columbia engineering innovative hand-held lab-on-a-chip could streamline blood testing worldwide. Successfully tested in Rwanda, mChip diagnoses infectious diseases like HIV and syphilis at patients' bedsides; new device could streamline blood testing worldwide

New York, NY — Samuel K. Sia, assistant professor of biomedical engineering at Columbia Engineering, has developed an innovative strategy for an integrated microfluidic-based diagnostic device—in effect, a lab-on-a-chip—that can perform complex laboratory assays, and do so with such simplicity that these tests can be carried out in the most remote regions of the world. In a paper published in Nature Medicine online on July 31, Sia presents the first published field results on how microfluidics—the manipulation of small amounts of fluids—and nanoparticles can be successfully leveraged to produce a functional low-cost diagnostic device in extreme resource-limited settings.

Sia and his team performed testing in Rwanda over the last four years in partnership with Columbia's Mailman School of Public Health and three local non-government organizations in Rwanda, targeting hundreds of patients. His device, known as mChip (mobile microfluidic chip), requires only a tiny finger prick of blood, effective even for a newborn, and gives—in less than 15 minutes—quantitative objective results that are not subject to user interpretation. This new technology significantly reduces the time between testing patients and treating them, providing medical workers in the field results that are much easier to read at a much lower cost. New low-cost diagnostics like the mChip could revolutionize medical care around the world.

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