Today In Manufacturing History: Oklahoma's Worst Mining Disaster Ever

On this day in 1892, a huge mine explosion killed nearly 100 people in Krebs, Oklahoma.

Image courtesy of the Krebs Heritage Museum website
Image courtesy of the Krebs Heritage Museum website

On this day in 1892, a huge mine explosion killed nearly 100 people in Krebs, Oklahoma. It was considered the "worst mining catastrophe" in the state's history. 

The owner of the Osage Coal & Mining Company's No. 11 mine was allegedly more interested in making a profit than the safety of the workers, which was what many believe played a major role in the explosion. The mine was well-known for its poor working conditions, resulting in high turnover rates, inexperienced or unskilled workers and little-to-no training.

Hundreds of workers were mining on the evening of January 7th when one of the experience-lacking employees unintentionally set off explosives. Nearly 100 miners were burned or buried from the blast, while 150 others faced serious injuries. The catastrophe affected almost every household in the community. 

A memorial was built in 2002 at the former mine site in honor of the victims.

Image courtesy of the Krebs Heritage Museum websiteImage courtesy of the Krebs Heritage Museum website
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