What's in a Cup?

I am continually amazed by the constant flow of new technologies on the market to help consumers maintain a healthy diet. While innovation is essential in the food industry, some inventions I have to question. The latest: IQhydr8.

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I am continually amazed by the constant flow of new technologies on the market to help consumers maintain a healthy diet. While innovation is essential in the food industry, some inventions I have to question. The latest: IQhydr8.

This smart hydration system was created by The American Diabetes Association to help measure and keep track of how much water a consumer drinks each day. The “Smart Bottle” even chimes to remind the user to hydrate more frequently.

Stephanie Dunbar, director of Nutrition and Medical Affairs at ADA, said:

“There has been a lot of focus on eating a healthy diet, but many people don’t consider the health effects of what they drink. The IQhydr8 is a unique approach to encourage everyone to drink more water instead of sugary drinks.”

While I am a strong advocate for filling your body with nutritious foods and drinks, I don’t quite understand how this system can truly benefit anyone. I am not here to mock the Smart Bottle, but rather prove a point.

Quite honestly, I don’t see this system aiding any consumers into a healthier lifestyle. My thought process has always been that if you truly want to eat more nutritiously, you will. A singing gadget is not going to make me want to drink any more water than I already do.

“The IQhydr8 is the first smart bottle of its kind, with the technology in the bottle’s cap, you don’t even need to remember how much you’re drinking,” said Jerry Sweeney, inventor of the IQhydr8.

With no disrespect to the inventors of the bottle, all this tells me is that consumers don’t even need to use their brain anymore, because this technology will do it for them.

Do I believe water is crucial to good health? Absolutely. Would I consider using this as a tool to remind me to keep hydrated? Probably not.

While the reasons behind the innovation are all in good intentions, I just don’t see this becoming a huge hit among consumers.

But, maybe I’m wrong. Perhaps some people could truly benefit from a chiming bell telling them to drink more. And if you’re one of them, I’d like to hear from you.

Is this a device you could see yourself using? If it is, please feel free to drop me a line and set me straight.

Regardless of your hydration process, I raise a glass to all who make the effort in drinking more water. Cheers!

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