Advertisement
Medical
Subscribe to Medical
View Sample

FREE Email Newsletter

Daily news and top headlines for manufacturing professionals

U.S. Boss Held In China Leaves Plant After Payout

June 27, 2013 9:17 am | by Louise Watt, Associated Press | News | Comments

Chip Starnes, who said he was "saddened" by the experience, told The Associated Press a deal was reached overnight to pay the scores of workers who had demanded severance packages similar to ones given to laid-off co-workers in a phased-out division, even though the company said the remaining workers weren't being laid off.

More Pushbutton Switches In RGB Colors

June 25, 2013 3:48 pm | Product Releases | Comments

 E-Switch has announced that it is now offering red, green or blue (RGB) color options for the UPL series of LED illuminated pushbutton switches. These switches come with a choice of SPDT or DPDT circuit options, plus momentary or latching options. 

Chinese Workers Holding U.S. Boss Say Wages Unpaid

June 25, 2013 7:34 am | by Louise Watt, Associated Press | News | Comments

The executive, Chip Starnes of Specialty Medical Supplies, denied the workers' allegations of two months of unpaid wages, as he endured a fifth day of captivity at the plant in the capital's northeastern suburbs, peering out from behind the bars of his office window.

Advertisement

Doctors Make Progress Toward 'Artificial Pancreas'

June 24, 2013 8:10 am | by Marilynn Marchione, AP Chief Medical Writer | News | Comments

Doctors are reporting a major step toward an "artificial pancreas," a device that would constantly monitor blood sugar in people with diabetes and automatically supply insulin as needed. A key component of such a system — an insulin pump programmed to shut down if blood-sugar dips too low while people are sleeping — worked as intended in a three-month study of 247 patients.

U.S. Factory Boss Held Hostage By Workers In Beijing

June 24, 2013 7:50 am | by Louise Watt, Associated Press | News | Comments

The workers were expecting wire transfers by Tuesday, he said, adding that about 80 of them had been blocking every exit around the clock and depriving him of sleep by shining bright lights and banging on windows of his office. He declined to clarify the amount, saying he wanted to keep it confidential.

Scientists: X-Ray Weapon 'Stuff Of Comic Books'

June 21, 2013 8:48 am | by Michael Virtanen, Associated Press | News | Comments

Glendon Scott Crawford and Eric J. Feight were charged with conspiracy to support terrorism in an indictment unsealed this week. Authorities say they built a remote-control switch they planned to attach to a van-mounted, industrial X-ray machine to secretly radiate people who would get sick or die days later.

Techne To Buy Bionostics For $104M

June 18, 2013 1:32 pm | News | Comments

Bionostics develops, manufactures and distributes products that verify the proper operation of in vitro diagnostic devices mainly used in blood glucose and blood gas testing. The company has supply relationships with the vast majority of in vitro diagnostic device manufacturers, Techne said.

To Ease Shortage Of Organs, Grow Them In A Lab?

June 17, 2013 8:13 am | by Malcolm Ritter, AP Science Writer | News | Comments

Growing lungs and other organs for transplant is still in the future, but scientists are working toward that goal. In North Carolina, a 3-D printer builds prototype kidneys. In several labs, scientists study how to build on the internal scaffolding of hearts, lungs, livers and kidneys of people and pigs to make custom-made implants.

Advertisement

FDA Aims To Prevent Hacking Of Medical Devices

June 14, 2013 7:53 am | News | Comments

The Food and Drug Administration wants makers of medical devices to design future products to prevent hackers from targeting them and disrupting patient care. A draft of the agency's recommendations — what the FDA calls guidance — was posted on its website Thursday.

Court: Human Genes Can't Be Patented

June 13, 2013 11:54 am | by Jesse J. Holland, Associated Press | News | Comments

The Supreme Court ruled Thursday that companies cannot patent parts of naturally-occurring human genes, a decision with the potential to profoundly affect the emerging and lucrative medical and biotechnology industries. The high court's unanimous judgment reverses three decades of patent awards by government officials.

UK To Start Regulating E-Cigarettes As Medicines

June 12, 2013 10:56 am | by Maria Cheng, AP Medical Writer | News | Comments

Britain will start regulating electronic cigarettes and other products containing nicotine as medicines, according to the country's top regulator. E-cigarettes are battery-operated products that turn nicotine into a vapor that is inhaled by the user.  

Feds: Engineer Tried To Steal Firm's Trade Secrets

June 6, 2013 7:44 am | News | Comments

U.S. Attorney Paul Fishman announced Wednesday that 36-year-old Ketan Maniar, an Indian national, was charged with stealing trade secrets for his own economic benefit from a worldwide medical technology company headquartered in Franklin Lakes. The company is among the world's leading suppliers of medical devices.

Sunscreen Slows Skin Aging, If Used Often Enough

June 4, 2013 12:06 pm | by Lauran Neergaard, AP Medical Writer | News | Comments

The research found that even if you're already middle-aged, it's not too late to start rubbing some sunscreen on — and not just at the beach or pool. The study of 900 people under 55 compared those randomly assigned to use sunscreen daily to those who used it when they deemed it necessary.

Advertisement

Soft Eye Contact Lens Fitted With LEDs

May 31, 2013 2:15 pm | by Jang-ung Park, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) | Articles | Comments

Transparent electrodes are in and of themselves nothing all that new – they have been widely used in things like touch screens, flat-screen TVs, solar cells and light-emitting devices. Currently transparent electrodes are commonly made from a material known as indium tin oxide (ITO).

Edwards Lifesciences Gets FDA Warning Letter

May 30, 2013 8:15 am | News | Comments

Edwards Lifesciences Corp. said Wednesday that it received a warning letter from the Food and Drug Administration regarding a facility that makes products used in heart surgery. The FDA won't approve devices that could be affected by those issues until the problems are resolved.

Bayer Gets Antitrust Clearance For Conceptus Deal

May 29, 2013 8:30 am | News | Comments

The German drug company Bayer AG has received antitrust clearance from the Federal Trade Commission for its approximately $1.1 billion acquisition of Conceptus. Bayer announced the deal last month, saying that it would help to expand the kinds of birth control it offers.

Wheelchair Lift Out Of Wis. Promises More Access

May 24, 2013 10:44 am | by Carrie Antlfinger, Associated Press | News | Comments

The invention process started about three years ago when the principal at Emerson Elementary School in Madison, Karen Kepler, told a school donor on a tour that her biggest wish was to have her building accessible to everyone. All four entrances to the 93-year-old building had stairs.

Interpreting The Human Genome

May 23, 2013 3:07 pm | by Silicon Mechanics | Articles | Comments

Knome had been using Amazon Web Services (AWS) for computationally intensive tasks, but needed to provide a locally-installed system with full control for clinically-oriented customers, who are sensitive about security, version control, and file transfer times.

Doctors Save Ohio Boy By 'Printing' An Airway Tube

May 23, 2013 9:36 am | by Marilynn Marchione, AP Chief Medical Writer | News | Comments

In a medical first, doctors used plastic particles and a 3-D laser printer to create an airway splint to save the life of a baby boy who used to stop breathing nearly every day. It's the latest advance from the booming field of regenerative medicine, making body parts in the lab.

Tight-Tolerance Springs And Stamping At MD&M East

May 21, 2013 2:23 pm | Product Releases | Comments

Connecticut Spring & Stamping will showcase its selection of precise medical product components, such as springs and progressive stampings, at MD&M East from June 18-20, 2013. The company says its tight-tolerance springs and metal stampings are ideal for handheld surgical devices, endoscopic clip appliers, suturing devices, stable removers and more. 

Feds: NYU Researchers Took Bribes From Chinese Co.

May 21, 2013 8:20 am | News | Comments

The researchers' work involves MRI technology. It's funded by the National Institutes of Health. They're accused of providing nonpublic information about the technology to a medical company in China and a research institution supported by the Chinese government.

Sports Seem OK For Many With Heart-Zapping Device

May 21, 2013 7:53 am | by Lauran Neergaard, AP Medical Writer | News | Comments

A registry tracked 372 people who stuck with competitive sports after having a defibrillator surgically implanted to guard against dangerous irregular heartbeats — and found that the lifesaving device worked when needed despite the physical exertion.  

J&J's DePuy To End 2 Hip Replacement Systems

May 17, 2013 1:38 pm | News | Comments

Johnson & Johnson's DePuy orthopedics business plans to stop selling a couple of hip replacement systems not widely used by doctors. DePuy will discontinue both its Ultamet Metal-on-Metal Articulation and Complete Ceramic-on-Metal Acetabular systems worldwide at the end of August.

Bard To Pay $51M To Resolve Kickback Investigation

May 14, 2013 1:41 pm | News | Comments

The agency said Monday that Bard will pay $48.3 million to resolve allegations that its actions resulted in false claims made to Medicare, and the company will pay another $2.2 million as part of a non-prosecution agreement. The agency says the kickbacks were paid between 1998 and 2006.

Cocaine Vaccine Passes Key Testing Hurdle

May 10, 2013 12:14 pm | by Weill Cornell Medical College | News | Comments

Researchers at Weill Cornell Medical College have successfully tested their novel anti-cocaine vaccine in primates, bringing them closer to launching human clinical trials. Their study, published online by the journal Neuropsychopharmacology, used a radiological technique to demonstrate that the anti-cocaine vaccine prevented the drug from reaching the brain and producing a dopamine-induced high.

X
You may login with either your assigned username or your e-mail address.
The password field is case sensitive.
Loading