Advertisement
Medical
Subscribe to Medical
View Sample

FREE Email Newsletter

Daily news and top headlines for manufacturing professionals

Michigan Man Among 1st To Get 'Bionic Eye'

April 23, 2014 8:08 am | by Mike Householder, Associated Press | News | Comments

The artificial implant in Pontz's left eye is part of a system developed by Second Sight that includes a small video camera and transmitter housed in a pair of glasses.                

ACA Chips At Core Goal Of Reducing Uninsured

April 21, 2014 2:39 pm | by Judy Lin, Associated Press | News | Comments

Questions of affordability, eligibility, immigrant access and the response from employers and state legislatures — obstacles that existed before the Affordable Care Act took effect — mean considerable work remains to make a larger dent in the uninsured population.

Scientists Try To Build Heart With 3-D Printer

April 10, 2014 8:01 am | by Dylan Lovan, Associated Press | News | Comments

It is an ambitious project to first, make a heart and then get it to work in a patient, and it could be years — perhaps decades — before a 3-D printed heart would ever be put in a person.                

Advertisement

Electrical Device Helps Paralyzed Men Move Their Legs

April 8, 2014 10:27 am | by Maria Cheng, AP Medical Writer | News | Comments

When the implanted device is activated, the men can wiggle their toes, lift their legs and stand briefly. But they aren't able to walk and still use wheelchairs to get around.              

Scientists In UK Make Body Parts In Lab

April 8, 2014 8:03 am | by Maria Cheng, AP Medical Writer | News | Comments

While only a handful of patients have received the British lab-made organs so far, researchers hope they will soon be able to transplant more types of body parts into patients, including what would be the world's first nose made partly from stem cells.

Decoding Germs' DNA To Fight Food Poisoning

April 7, 2014 8:37 am | by Lauran Neergaard, AP Medical Writer | News | Comments

The nation's disease detectives are beginning a program to try to outsmart outbreaks by routinely decoding the DNA of potentially deadly bacteria and viruses.                

Scientists Create 3-D Wiring Diagram Of Mouse Brain

April 2, 2014 2:17 pm | by Malcolm Ritter, AP Science Writer | News | Comments

Scientists have created a detailed, three-dimensional wiring diagram of the mouse brain. That should help researchers seek clues about how the human brain works in health and disease.             

J&J Accepts $4B Offer For Diagnostics Unit

March 31, 2014 11:22 am | News | Comments

Johnson & Johnson has accepted an offer of about $4 billion from the private equity firm The Carlyle Group to buy its Ortho-Clinical Diagnostics business.                 

Advertisement

Study Backs Nonsurgical Heart Valve Fix

March 31, 2014 8:34 am | by Marilynn Marchione, AP Chief Medical Writer | News | Comments

Survival rates were better one year later for people who had a new valve placed through a tube into an artery instead.                       

Women Say J&J Trashed Records In Product Injury Suits

March 27, 2014 8:01 am | by Linda A. Johnson, AP Business Writer | News | Comments

Lawyers and advocates for women alleging Johnson & Johnson products injured them urged the U.S. Justice Department on Wednesday to investigate their claims the health care giant deliberately destroyed many documents critical to their lawsuits.

Saving A Life With 3D Printing

March 24, 2014 12:57 pm | by Joel Hans, Managing Editor, Manufacturing.net | News | Comments

Dr. Glenn Green and Scott Hollister came up with the solution to save a young boy's life: use 3D printing to build small splints that would help keep his trachea open until it was strong enough to do so itself.          

IBM's Watson To Sequence Cancer DNA

March 19, 2014 10:34 am | News | Comments

IBM and its Watson cloud computing system are partnering with the New York Genome Center to help it sequence DNA for the treatment of brain cancer.                   

Fresenius To Create Over 600 Jobs At New Tenn. Plant

March 12, 2014 9:48 am | News | Comments

Renal services provider Fresenius Medical Care has announced it will locate its East Coast manufacturing facility in Knoxville, creating 665 jobs in the coming years.                

Advertisement

FDA Approves Headband To Prevent Migraines

March 12, 2014 7:45 am | News | Comments

The Food and Drug Administration said Tuesday it approved a nerve-stimulating headband as the first medical device to prevent migraine headaches.                   

Gene Therapy May Help Control HIV

March 6, 2014 9:00 am | by Marilynn Marchione, AP Chief Medical Writer | News | Comments

Scientists have modified genes in the blood cells of HIV patients to help them resist the AIDS virus, and say the treatment seems safe and promising.                  

Surgeon: 'Bone Putty' Could Accelerate Healing For Soldiers

March 3, 2014 1:05 pm | by Mike Schmidt, Editor, Surgical Products | News | Comments

Dr. Michael Heggeness is working on a $1.6 million research product — a "bone putty" — that could be a viable alternative to typical treatment options for combat-related trauma issues.                 

Manufacturing.net Rewind: Boeing's Spy Phone; Detroit's UAW Worries

February 28, 2014 2:41 pm | News | Comments

Check out some of this week's top headlines from across Manufacturing.net, from a phone that can self-destruct from an airplane manufacturer to more stress for Detroit from the United Auto Workers union.          

Republicans Blast FDA Monitoring Of Whistleblowers

February 26, 2014 11:33 am | News | Comments

In a report published Tuesday, House Republicans say the FDA's computer surveillance may have overstepped federal laws designed to protect government whistleblowers. Using software that took rapid fire screen shots of employees' computers, the FDA picked up emails from the five whistleblowers to members of Congress.

Star Trek Healing Devices Are Coming To Your Local Hospital

February 24, 2014 3:32 pm | by Allegra Sparta, Contributor, PD&D | Blogs | Comments

Maybe we can transport patients with hover-stretchers and flying ambulances, too. Announcements like this are bound to raise a few eyebrows, but we live in a world where 3D-printed hearts and other highly advanced surgical procedures are slowly becoming commonplace.

Judge Rules For Company In W. Va. Mesh Lawsuit

February 19, 2014 7:38 am | News | Comments

A federal judge has ruled in favor of a manufacturer in a lawsuit brought by a Texas woman who claimed her pelvic pain was caused by implanted surgical mesh. U.S. District Judge Joseph R. Goodwin on Tuesday dismissed Carolyn Lewis' lawsuit against Johnson & Johnson subsidiary Ethicon in the middle of a jury trial that began Feb. 10.

Experiment Adds Sense Of Touch To Artificial Hand

February 5, 2014 2:27 pm | by Lauran Neergaard, AP Medical Writer | News | Comments

European researchers have taken a step toward prosthetics with a sense of touch: They created a robotic hand that let an amputee feel differences in the shape and hardness of different objects, and adjust his grasp in response.     

FDA Approves Pill Camera To Screen Colon

February 4, 2014 7:51 am | by Matthew Perrone, AP Health Writer | News | Comments

A kinder, gentler approach to one of the most dreaded exams in medicine is on the way: U.S. regulators have cleared a bite-size camera to help screen patients who have trouble with colonoscopies. The ingestible pill camera from Given Imaging is designed to help doctors spot polyps and other early signs of colon cancer.

Doctors: Too Few Cancer Patients Enroll In Studies

January 29, 2014 8:41 am | by Marilynn Marchione, AP Chief Medical Writer | News | Comments

About 20 percent of the studies were not completed for reasons that had nothing to do with the treatment's safety or effectiveness, both legitimate reasons for ending a study early. Poor accrual — the inability to enroll enough patients in enough time to finish the study — led to nearly 40 percent of premature endings.

Want To Get The Flu? Volunteers Sneeze For Science

January 27, 2014 12:36 pm | by Lauran Neergaard, AP Medical Writer | News | Comments

Forget being sneezed on: Government scientists are deliberately giving dozens of volunteers the flu by squirting the live virus straight up their noses. It may sound bizarre, but the rare type of research is a step in the quest for better flu vaccines. It turns out that how the body fends off influenza remains something of a mystery.

Colgate-Palmolive Building New Tenn. Plant

January 24, 2014 9:11 am | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

In a news release, Tennessee Economic and Community Development Commissioner Bill Hagerty says the company will invest $25 million in manufacturing equipment and building and infrastructure improvements in Morristown.         

X
You may login with either your assigned username or your e-mail address.
The password field is case sensitive.
Loading